What have I been up to?

Hey beautiful people. Can you believe we’re in the middle of summer already and over half way through 2019? I know I’ve been MIA for a minute. I thought I’d jump on today and give you some insight on what I’ve been up to in my spare time.

I’ve been working on getting a decade of experience in working with brands and businesses of all shapes and sizes out on paper and developing some tools to help fellow entrepreneurs, start-up’s and small businesses (professionals) to help set them up for a great market experience.

I can’t say too much more than that now, but if you would like to be the first to know what’s happening pop your email address over in the Tailor Made Social holding page.

Stand out before you fit in

Be different. Too many of us try to fit in because culture and hierarchy have led us to believe that we should. Why? What good is it if you become like joe bloggs on your left or June wright on your right? What if you seek to improve, to change, to move the needle in your industry or area? To do great things you must be willing to stand out.

Things you should know about being a marketer

Two things you need to know before you become a marketer:

1. Change is inevitable – I’ve come to learn that change for humans is not a favorable word. I’ve even stumbled across colleagues in my industry who have really struggled with change and the fast-paced rate that some businesses are being pulled towards in the fight for more attention.

 
2. No man is an island – it’s really stunning to me when I see a marketer who doesn’t want to play team. I think those who let the competitive nature of this industry run loose really stunt their growth in the long run. We need each other to be authentic and collaborative in today’s marketing, and in the words of someone wise, “If you want to go fast go alone if you want to go far, go together.”

Quote of the week

Hi all,

It’s been a minute… I thought I’d kick of my first post of the year with a quote on community building. This week’s quote is from Megan Adams.

www.thesocialexchangeblog.com

Don’t forget to touch base with your customers once they have engaged with your brand or business.

Three ways to engage with your community through media:

  • Paid media – Through paid ads online and across social.
  • Owned media – Through your website, blog, and any other channel of communication that you own.
  • Shared media – Through the content you post via social media that can be shared.

7 tips on creating a social media campaign

 

  1. Set your goals – what’s the purpose of this campaign? Think about the gains you would like to see from running it. Is it to engage your audience, drive traffic to a particular place, or action? Is it to increase sales revenue? Be specific as you can.
  2. Choose your channels – Don’t just choose a channel like Facebook because it’s the biggest social networking platform. Think about who you’re reaching, and where they may be. Marketing to everyone will get you nowhere.
  3. Create your content – value matters so make it count. Get creative and depending on your audience and goals you might want to consider the style of your content. Make sure it adds value to your target consumer in some way.
  4. Amplify – consider if this is right for your brand, but make the most of your campaign by using social media influencers on the platforms you decide to target. Of course, make sure they are a good fit with your brand, but if your budget allows for this, then this is a powerful tip to heed.
  5. Paid social – there is no getting away from this if you want serious results on social media, but there are great affordable opportunities to play around with if you don’t have much of a budget for this. A small investment can boost your traffic, leads and with your campaign make it scalable.
  6. Collect analytics – here want to look at the numbers, but also the quality of the campaign performance. How did your users interact with your content, and did they take the action? Have you reached those all important goals you set at the beginning?
  7. Follow-up – What will you do to follow up on the success? Don’t let this be a one hit wonder, but look for lessons you can learn from the campaign and ways you can capitalise or reward those who took the action you wanted in some way. Social media marketing is a moving target so have fun, be authentic and always look for ways to add value to your end consumer.

 

How often should I post on social media?

I get asked this question a lot, so today I thought I’d do a quick blog post on my recommendations.

*Disclaimer I am by no means saying that I have been great at sticking to this with my own blog for the past few years. Working full-time, building a business and life has got in the way of me applying my own advice with this blog. However, this is my professional opinion and best practice tip that I hope helps shed a little light for you.

Consistency is key

The true answer is I am unable to suggest what works best for you, and how often you should post. It depends on your business, your objectives, and your resource. What I will say though is that if you post sporadically every few months or weeks, then it doesn’t look good. It can also give the impression that your business has gone bust or non-extinct.

Managing social media channels is a full-time job, so if you are a small business or start-up, then I recommend choosing two social media channels that best capture the audience you are trying to reach.

For example if you are trying to reach a mother with a lifestyle product, then you might want to think about Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. And if you are a business looking to sell to other businesses, then you might want to focus your social media efforts on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Twitter is a noisy platform, so I would recommend trying to post between 2-4 times a day if you can.

For a channel like Facebook and Instagram, I would start with once post a day. However, please note this is to maintain the profiles and not with regards to reach as this Facebook most definitely requires a level of paid social when targeting a specific audience. In addition to that, bare in mind Facebook and Instagram post require heavily on images and video content, and making it accessible to a large and growing mobile audience. This will definitely require more crafting with images, video content, and tailoring of text and call to action.

3 benefits of scheduling content

  1. You create more room to be reactive when the unexpected happens, which it always does. One of my favourite examples of this was the Oreo’s dunk in the dark twitter ad, which goes all the way back to 2013, and still relevant today.
  2. You allow yourself time to carve out an library of content that enables you to plan time-sensitive content such as events, awareness days, special events in a social media calendar.
  3. You can track what content performs best. Analysing your performance is an important part of my job as a social media manager. It’s not good enough to litter your social media profiles with content that doesn’t perform, so we must keep track and be prepared to make adjustments along the way.

There are many tools that you could use to help keep your social media profiles alive. I recently wrote a blog reviewing a few here, but there area  million more. Personally, I use Buffer it does what I need to do and it’s cost effective compared to some of the others I know of. The first two channels are free. If you have more than 2 channels, then it can cost you from $10 a month.